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Demographic and quality control parameters of laboratory and wild Anastrepha striata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2014

Emilio Hernández
Affiliation:
Subdirección de Desarrollo de Métodos, Programa Moscafrut (SAGARPA-IICA), Camino a los Cacahotales s/n, 30860Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas, México
J. Pedro Rivera
Affiliation:
Subdirección de Desarrollo de Métodos, Programa Moscafrut (SAGARPA-IICA), Camino a los Cacahotales s/n, 30860Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas, México
Marysol Aceituno-Medina
Affiliation:
Subdirección de Desarrollo de Métodos, Programa Moscafrut (SAGARPA-IICA), Camino a los Cacahotales s/n, 30860Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas, México
Dina Orozco-Dávila
Affiliation:
Subdirección de Desarrollo de Métodos, Programa Moscafrut (SAGARPA-IICA), Camino a los Cacahotales s/n, 30860Metapa de Domínguez, Chiapas, México
Jorge Toledo
Affiliation:
Departamento de Agricultura, Sociedad y Ambiente, El Colegio de la Frontyera Sur, Tapachula Chiapas30700, México
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In this study, rearing systems for, and the quality and demographic parameters of, a wild strain (WS) and two laboratory strains (LSs; one maintained on a torula yeast-casein diet and the other on a starter-gel diet) were determined for the American guava fruit fly Anastrepha striata (Schiner). No differences were observed between the LSs, but there were significant differences between the LSs and WSs. The LSs had the highest values for larval recovery, pupal weight, egg hatch, number of eggs/female per day, net reproductive rate and intrinsic rate of increase. Therefore, during a short oviposition period, the LSs had a high fecundity. There were no differences in pupation at 24 h and larval weight between the WS and LS. However, the values of parameters, adult emergence, female and male life expectancies, age at first oviposition, oviposition and post-oviposition periods and mean generation time were the highest in the WS.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 2014 

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Demographic and quality control parameters of laboratory and wild Anastrepha striata (Diptera: Tephritidae)
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