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USE OF VALUE OF INFORMATION IN UK HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2015

Syed Mohiuddin
Affiliation:
MCHE, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester
Elisabeth Fenwick
Affiliation:
HEHTA, Institute of Health & Wellbeing, University of Glasgow
Katherine Payne
Affiliation:
MCHE, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, katherine.payne@manchester.ac.uk
Corresponding

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify and critically appraise the use of Value of Information (VOI) analyses undertaken as part of health technology assessment (HTA) reports in England and Wales.

Methods: A systematic review of National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded HTA reports published between 2004 and 2013 identified the use of VOI methods and key analytical details in terms of: (i) types of VOI methodology used; (ii) parameters and key assumptions; and (iii) conclusions drawn in terms of the need for further research.

Results: A total of 512 HTA reports were published during the relevant timeframe. Of these, 203 reported systematic review and economic modeling studies and 25 of these had used VOI method(s). Over half of the twenty-five studies (n = 13) conducted both EVPI (Expected Value of Perfect Information) and EVPPI (Expected Value of Partial Perfect Information) analyses. Eight studies conducted EVPI analysis, three studies conducted EVPI, EVPPI, and EVSI (Expected Value of Sampling Information) analyses and one study conducted EVSI analysis only. The level of detail reporting the methods used to conduct the VOI analyses varied.

Conclusions: This review has shown that the frequency of the use of VOI methods is increasing at a slower pace compared with the published volume of HTA reports. This review also suggests that analysts reporting VOI method(s) in HTA reports should aim to describe the method(s) in sufficient detail to enable and encourage decision-makers guiding research prioritization decisions to use the potentially valuable outputs from quantitative VOI analyses.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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