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The Use of Technology Assessment by Hospitals, Health Maintenance Organizations, and Third-Party Payers in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2009

Bryan R. Luce
Affiliation:
Battelle Medical Technology Assessment and Policy (MEDTAP) Program
Ruth E. Brown
Affiliation:
Battelle Medical Technology Assessment and Policy (MEDTAP) Program

Abstract

A case study design was used to determine the reliance on technology assessment of decisionmakers in hospitals, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), and third-party payers. Thirty different organizations were contacted and semistructured interviews conducted. The study found that hospitals, HMOs, and insurers are conducting technology assessments, but the form and sophistication of these analyses range widely. Hospitals are particularly focused on traditional financial analyses (“prudent purchasing”) with the exception of pharmacy committees, which generally conduct more sophisticated socio-economic analyses. HMOs and insurers conduct outcome assessments for coverage of expensive or controversial technologies but exclude economics. Technology assessment will become increasingly important in resource allocation decision making and it is in the interest of technology providers to foster better information, a more comprehensive assessment process, and a more efficient assessment system.

Type
General Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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