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Technology Assessment: Old, New, and Needs-based

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2009

Peter Tugwell
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa
Chitr Sitthi-amorn
Affiliation:
Chulalongkorn University
Annette O'connor
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa
Janet Hatcher-roberts
Affiliation:
International Development Research Centre
Yves Bergevin
Affiliation:
Canadian International Development Agency and McGill University
Michael Wolfson
Affiliation:
Statistics Canada

Abstract

Recent health reports, including the 1993 World Development Report, have emphasized the importance of integrating the needs of the population into technology assessment. This paper reviews previous approaches to technology assessment and identifies the missing link between technology and its impact on the physical, emotional, and social needs of the community, namely needs-based technology assessment. It stresses the key role played by issues of equity and community values in making technology decisions. A number of models for needs-based technology assessment are described.

Type
Special Section: Needs-Based Technology Assessment: Who Can Afford Not to Use It?
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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