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Live Attenuated Vaccine Vectors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2009

John J. Mekalanos
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School

Abstract

Several different live attenuated vaccine vectors currently are under development. These vaccines are composed of living viruses or bacteria that are innocuous to the host but can replicate in host tissues and induce immune responses. The genes encoding foreign antigens can be inserted into these vectors to produce multivalent vaccines that promise to induce immunity to more than one target disease after the administration of a single dose of vaccine.

Type
Special Section: Vaccines and Public Health: Assessing Technologies and Public Policies
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

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