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Accrual of Patients to Randomized Clinical Trials: Factors Affecting Cancer Prevention and Control Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2009

Arnold D. Kaluzny
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Linda M. Lacey
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Richard Warnecke
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Joseph P. Morrissey
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Edward J. Sondik
Affiliation:
U.S. National Cancer Institute
Leslie Ford
Affiliation:
U.S. National Cancer Institute

Abstract

Clinical judgment is increasingly being challenged by the need for randomized clinical trials. The 1987 National Cancer Institute mandate—that the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) accrue patients to cancer control protocols—provided an opportunity to examine the factors that affect accrual performance. An analysis of 52 CCOPs and their research bases participating in the program found that the availability of protocols, involvement with research base activities, a demonstrated link to community physicians (particularly those physicians, such as surgeons, who had access to patients), and the use of personal contacts to inform non-CCOP physicians about CCOP activities were important facilitating factors for accruing patients to cancer prevention and control trials.

Type
General Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

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