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Criticality mitigation in a quasi-constant coupling position independent resonant IPT network

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2018

Alex Pacini*
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering ‘Guglielmo Marconi’ (DEI) of the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Franco Mastri
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering ‘Guglielmo Marconi’ (DEI) of the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Diego Masotti
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering ‘Guglielmo Marconi’ (DEI) of the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Alessandra Costanzo
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering ‘Guglielmo Marconi’ (DEI) of the University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
*
Author for correspondence: Alex Pacini, E-mail: alex.pacini@studio.unibo.it

Abstract

This paper discusses some significant design issues that are faced in resonant inductive system for wireless power transfer ‘on the move’. The targeted system adopts a single AC source to power a sequence of transmitting (Tx) coils, placed along the Rx path, whose geometry is optimized to minimize the variations of coupling for every possible Rx position. To retain a constant coupling coefficient, two nearby Tx coils are series-connected and simultaneously activated, establishing a path without any theoretical bound on its length, by a suitable switching network. This work analyzes the effects of asynchronous switching times, which are rigorously accounted for and minimized by a proper design of the compensating circuit elements, minimizing both the voltage spikes and the over currents on the coils, while keeping the system at resonance. A prototype operating at 6.78 MHz is built and experimental validations are carried out to verify the feasibility of a constant coupling link without experiencing the mentioned effects, but the adopted procedure is general and independent on its size or frequency.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the European Microwave Association 2018 

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References

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Criticality mitigation in a quasi-constant coupling position independent resonant IPT network
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