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Legal Information on the Web: the Case of Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2019

Extract

Accessing legal information is a primary requirement for a variety of communities: ordinary citizens, scholars, and professionals. The dissemination of legal information contributes to the rule of law and to the overall ideals of democracy in a number of ways. Many are the benefits of accessing legal information, such as the awareness of the applicable rule of law, the creation of conditions necessary to the equality and fairness of a legal system, while improving the functioning of democratic institutions, the development and improvement of social and economic conditions.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the International Association of Law Libraries 

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References

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