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A King Who Devours His People+: Jiang Zemin and the Falun Gong Crackdown: A Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2019

Extract

In July 1999, the government of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) began an official crackdown against the qigong cultivation group known as Falun Gong. Intended to quickly contain and eliminate what the PRC considers an evil or heretical cult (xiejiao), the suppression has instead created the longest sustained and, since the Tiananmen Square protests of June 1989, most widely known human rights protest conducted in the PRC. The Falun Gong has received worldwide recognition and support while the crackdown continues to provoke harsh criticism against the PRC as new allegations of human rights violations arise.

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Copyright © 2006 by the International Association of Law Libraries 

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References

1 Qigong (chee-gung) refers to the cultivation of qi energy in the human body through breathing exercises and meditation to promote health or cure illness. The regulation of qi is the basis of traditional Chinese medicine. Richard Madsen, Understanding Falun Gong, 99 Current History 243, 243–44 (2000).Google Scholar

2 The name Falun Gong means ‘Practice of the Wheel of the Law'. Falun Gong is also commonly known by its practitioners as Falun Dafa or ‘Great Method of the Wheel of Law'. Benjamin Penny, The Falun Gong, Buddhism, and “Buddhist qigong”, 29 Asian Stud. Rev. 35, 35 (2005). In this paper, I will use Falun Gong when referring to the group and Falun Dafa when referring to the practice.Google Scholar

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7 Li Hongzhi received the “Advancing Marginal Sciences Award” at the 1993 Oriental Health Expos in Beijing. Also in 1993, “The Foundation for Encouraging People to Fight with Criminals” which is connected to the police ministry, wrote a letter of support for Li Hongzhi to the CQSRA. Lu Yunfeng, Entrepreneurial Logics and the Evolution of Falun Gong, 44(2) J. for Sci. Stud. Religion 173, 175 (2005).Google Scholar

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56 Chang, supra n. 6, at 25.Google Scholar

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63 Joseph Kahn, Legal Gadfly Bites Hard, and Beijing Slaps Him, N. Y. Times Al (Dec. 13, 2005).Google Scholar

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69 The PRC confiscated 169 million illegal publications in 2005, including 4.6 million Falun Gong and other evil cult organization propaganda materials. Cong.-Exec. Comm. China, People's Daily Publishes 2005 Censorship Numbers, http://www.cecc.gov/pages/virtualAcad/index.phpd?showsingle=46660 (Nov. 6, 2006).Google Scholar

71 U.S. Dept. State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor, International Religious Freedom Report 2006: China (includes Tibet, Hong Kong, and Macau) § II. Restrictions on Religious Freedom (Sept. 15, 2006) (available at http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2006/71338.htm).Google Scholar

73 U.S. Dept. State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor, International Religious Freedom Report 2006: China (includes Taiwan only) § I. Religious Demography (Sept. 15, 2006) (available at http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2006/71337.htm).Google Scholar

74 Mark R. Bell & Taylor C. Boas, Falun Gong and the Internet: Evangelism, Community, and Struggle for Survival, 6 Nova Religio 277, 278–79 (2003).Google Scholar

75 Thomas Lum, CRS Report for Congress: China and Falun Gong 8, (May 25, 2006).Google Scholar

76 Justice for Falun Gong, Legal Actions, http://flgjustice.org (updated Nov. 23, 2006, 23:42).Google Scholar

77 Plaintiffs A, B, C, D, E, F v. Jiang Zemin, 282 F. Supp.2d 875 (N.D. Ill. 2003), aff'd, Ye v. Jiang Zemin, 383 F. 3d 620 (7th Cir. 2004), cert. denied, 544 U.S. 975 (2005).Google Scholar

78 Doe I v. Liu Qi, 349 F. Supp 2d 1258 (N.D. Cal. 2004).Google Scholar

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