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Book Review Instructions Download Instruction for Contributors in PDF. (275 KB).

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ICLQ Articles

Instructions for Contributors

The ICLQ welcomes the submission of contributions for consideration by the editors with a view to publication. All manuscripts must be submitted online via: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/iclq.

The Board of Editors will only consider material which complies with the following:

1) The submission should be an original, unpublished, work not currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. Please note that our exclusive submission policy means you cannot submit your work to another journal until you have received a decision from us. If you would like to submit to another journal, you must withdraw your article from consideration by the ICLQ. Please visit www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-policies for information on our open access policies, compliance with major funding bodies, and guidelines on depositing your manuscript in an institutional repository.

2) The ICLQ publishes articles that deal with public international law, private international law, human rights law, comparative law and European Union Law. It particularly encourages the submission of innovative and original articles whose theme or content illuminate several of these subject areas. Articles which do no more than rehearse familiar and well-known material, or which are concerned only with national law (other than private international law) in a non-comparative way, should not be submitted.

3) Long articles should not exceed 15,000 words including footnotes. Pieces of up to 8,000 words including footnotes will be considered for the 'Short Articles' section, which may secure earlier publication. The editors will decide on the section to which all contributions, irrespective of length, are best suited should they be accepted for publication. ScholarOne will require you to enter the word count (including footnotes) when submitting your article, and to indicate if you intend it for the 'Short Articles' section.

4) should be numbered consecutively through the article and be in the form normally used by the ICLQ (see Style Guide below). Footnoting should not be excessive, and certainly no more than a third of the total word count.

5) A short (50-100 words) abstract of the article should be supplied. We reserve the right to edit abstracts for length and style. Please also supply a minimum of five keywords (and a maximum of ten) for your article to enable digital searching.

6) Please ensure you have read and complied with the ICLQ Style Guide below before submitting your manuscript.

Authors, particularly those whose first language is not English, may wish to have their English-language manuscripts checked by a native speaker before submission. This is optional, but may help to ensure that the academic content of the paper is fully understood by the editor and any reviewers. We list a number of third-party services specialising in language editing and/or translation, and suggest that authors contact as appropriate: http://www.cambridge.org/academic/author-services/

Please note that the use of any of these services is voluntary, and at the author's own expense. Use of these services does not guarantee that the manuscript will be accepted for publication, nor does it restrict the author to submitting to a Cambridge published journal.

7) The ICLQ only accepts submissions online via the ScholarOne platform. To upload your manuscript please go to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/iclq. Detailed instructions for submitting your manuscript online can be found at the submission website by clicking on the 'Instructions and Forms' link in the top right of the screen; and then clicking on the 'Author Submission Instructions' icon on the following page. The Editor will acknowledge receipt of the manuscript, with a reference number, which should be quoted in all correspondence.

8) Authors should state their present academic or professional affiliation and indicate any professional or personal involvement in the subject matter of the article in the box provided. Please ensure the word document of your article is anonymous for peer review purposes before you upload it. Please do not upload a separate title page or CV.

9) Authors of articles in International & Comparative Law Quarterly have the option to publish on a Gold Open Access basis. This model of publishing makes the article freely available for anyone to read and reproduce immediately upon publication, under Creative Commons licensing. Under this model the costs associated with the publication process, from peer review through to copy-editing and typesetting, are covered by an article processing charge which is met by the author, the author's funding body or institution.

Authors will be given this option at the point at which the article is accepted. 

All authors published in International & Comparative Law Quarterly also retain the right to archive the accepted (peer reviewed, prior to production) version of their article in institutional and non-commercial subject repositories. This activity is known as Green Open Access, allowing authors to meet the requirements of their funders. The journal's Green Open Access policies are included in the licence to publish form that an author receives on acceptance and are also detailed here: www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-policies/open-access-journals/green-open-access-policy-for-journals

For more detail about Open Access, see: www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-policies

ICLQ Style Guide

1. Layout

All articles should be submitted in 12-point font, single-spaced MS Word document with margins of at least 2.5 cm.

The first page should include the title of the article (in capitals), and a short abstract. Please do not include your name, affiliation or any acknowledgements on the submission, but enter it in the appropriate boxes on ScholarOne. New paragraphs should be indented, except for the first paragraph in a section. All sentences should be separated by a single space and double spaces should not be used.

The ICLQ uses the following heading levels:

I. FIRST-LEVEL SUBHEADING

A. Second-level Subheading

1. Third-level subheading

a) Fourth-level subheading

Lists

Numbered lists should use Arabic numerals. Bullet-point lists may also be used. Where list items are complete sentences, capitals and punctuation may be used. Otherwise, use lower case and a semi-colon to end each point, eg:

Activities of the Institute include:

  • projects;
  • events;
  • publications.

Quotations

Quotations of fewer than three lines should be set in single quotation marks within the main text, with double quotation marks reserved for quotations within quotations. Longer quotations should begin on a new line, without quotation marks, and should be indented.

Images

Charges apply for all colour figures that appear in the print version of the journal. At the time of submission, contributors should clearly state whether their figures should appear in colour in the online version only, or whether they should appear in colour online and in the print version. There is no charge for including colour figures in the online version of the Journal but it must be clear that colour is needed to enhance the meaning of the figure, rather than simply being for aesthetic purposes. If you request colour figures in the printed version, you will be contacted by CCC-Rightslink who are acting on our behalf to collect Author Charges. Please follow their instructions in order to avoid any delay in the publication of your article.

2. Points of Style

Abbreviations

  • All abbreviations should be spelled out in first use with the abbreviation following in brackets, eg ‘European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)’.
  • Abbreviations and acronyms should not be followed or separated by a full stop, eg:

document – doc

number – no

paragraph – para

United Kingdom – UK

  • Use ‘per cent’ rather than the symbol ‘%’.

Capital letters

  • State is capitalized when it means a country, but not when it means an internal state, eg

the State breached its obligations under the treaty;

the state of Minnesota;

EU Member State.

  • Article should be capitalized, eg Article and Art.

Dates and Times

  • Dates should be written in the form ‘day month year’ (2 December 2003).
  • For a period of years use: 2000–03.
  • Times should be written using the 24-hour clock, not am or pm, eg: ‘09.30’ and ‘18.15’.

Italics

  • Words that have become part of the English language should not be italicized (ad hoc, ibid, de facto, ex officio, per se, etc).
  • Phrases in other languages should be italicized.

Numbers

  • Numerals should be written out up to and including ten; 11 and above should be given in figures. Where a sentence includes numerals either side of ten, these should all be given as figures.
  • Ranges of numbers are elided to the shortest pronounceable form, so 283–5, rather than 283-285; but note 311–12.
  • Ordinal numbers (1st, 2nd, etc) should be written out in full (first, second, etc), particularly in the case of centuries (‘the seventeenth century’).

Punctuation

  • The serial comma (ie the one before ‘and’ in ‘peace, war, and defence’) should not be used.
  • Words omitted from quotations should be indicated by three full stops:

the Court stated: ‘There is no suggestion in the present case ... that the father is in any way unfit to have access.’

  • Where quotations do not comprise a full sentence the punctuation should be placed outside the closing quotation mark.
  • A single space rather than a double space should be used after full stops.
  • Split infinitives should not be used.
  • All footnotes should end with a full stop.

Spelling

  • Spelling should follow the Oxford English Dictionary or the Concise Oxford Dictionary.
  • For the ‘-ise’ / ‘-ize’ sound expressed as ‘z’, use z instead of s. For example:

organize, recognizing, emphasize, globalization, modernize, authorize

  • There are some exceptions, which always take s instead of z. If in doubt, check the Oxford English dictionary. Below are some examples:

paralyse, analysing, compromise, exercise, otherwise

  • Note the following miscellaneous spellings:

case law

Cold War

cooperation

decision-making

multinational

nonetheless

policy-maker

postcolonial

postmodern

Sharia

socio-economic

socio-political

soft-law (adjectival)

transnational

World War II

Titles

  • ‘Professor’ should always be spelt in full, not abbreviated to ‘Prof’.
  • Commas should not be used to separate names and gongs (ie The Hon Judge David Edward CBE QC MA).

3. Citations

ICLQ style is based on the Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA). This guide is to be followed in the first instance. For citations not covered here please see OSCOLA http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/publications/oscola.php. If the citations are international, please see the OSCOLA 2006 guide to citing international legal citations https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/sites/files/oxlaw/oscola_2006_citing_international_law.pdf.

Footnote style

Footnote cues should appear after the punctuation mark, eg:

This was stated by the Court in Defrenne.1

Words such as ‘article’ or ‘paragraph’ should be written in full in the main text but should be abbreviated in footnotes.

article art

paragraph para

volume vol

  • Always write ‘section’ in full; do not use §.
  • With the exception of ibid (see below), avoid use of Latin in footnotes, ie supra, infra, op.cit.
  • Authors should be identified by their initials and surname, eg JES Bloggs.
  • In a subsequent citation of a source, briefly identify the source and provide a cross-citation in brackets to the footnote in which the full citation can be found, eg Smith (n 4) / Gasser (n 6). If the subsequent citation is in the footnote immediately following the full citation and that citation is the only one in the preceding footnote, ‘ibid’ should be used instead.

Primary sources

  • Cases should appear in italics, including the v, which takes no full stop. Where there are multiple parties, only the first claimant and the first defendant are named.

Callaghan v The Queen (1952) 87 CLR 115 (HCA)

  • Unreported decisions should be reported by their neutral citation if they have one, otherwise in the following format: name of case (court, date of judgment) transcript page or paragraph number. Omit the word ‘unreported’.

Thannhauser v Westpac Banking Corporation (Federal Court of Australia, 9 December 1991) [90].

Opuz v Turkey, Application No 33401/02, Judgment of 9 June 2009.

Secondary sources

Where there are more than three authors only the first author should be cited, eg:

RES Bloggs et al.

When citing articles or chapters in books, do not include the start page of the contribution, but merely the page referred to.

Citations should follow the following examples:

Books JES Bloggs, The Application of the European Convention on Human Rights (3rd edn, Butterworths 1987) vol 2, 17–68.

Articles JES Bloggs, ‘The Future of Human Rights in Europe’ (1989) 1 NQHR 6.

Articles in books JES Bloggs, ‘Children and the European Convention on Human Rights’ in F Matscher and H Petzold (eds), Protecting Human Rights: The European Dimension (Hart Publishing 1988) 73.

Websites D Smith, ‘Virtual Friend Fires Employee’ (Naked Law, 1 May 2009) . Websites should not have an accessed date.

Working Papers JD Bloggs, ‘European Law’ (2010) Oxford Legal Studies Research Paper 1/2010, 8 .

Conference Papers B McFarlane and D Nolan, ‘Remedying Reliance: The Future Development of Promissory and Proprietary Estoppel in English Law’ (Obligations III conference, Brisbane, July 2006).

Last updated 22nd October 2019

ICLQ Book Reviews


General Instructions for Contributors

If you wish to review a title for the ICLQ and require a copy of the book, please email your suggestion to the Acting Managing Editor Anthony Wenton A.Wenton@biicl.org including a brief biography indicating your suitability to review the book and your postal address. If the book is one we wish to have reviewed, a copy will be requested from the publisher for you.

Alternatively if you already have access to a copy of the book, you may simply upload your review to the ScholarOne platform, where all reviews must be submitted: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/iclq

Book reviews should be between 500 and 1,000 words.

Longer book review articles which discuss more than one book covering a similar theme will be considered for publication, at the discretion of the book review editors. These should not exceed 1,500 words.

Book reviews should not contain footnotes or endnotes.

All book reviews, whether solicited or otherwise, will be subject to a review process, and a request to write a review or receiving a review copy from us are no guarantee of publication. Any connection to the author/editors of the book should be declared by the reviewer at the time of submission (or earlier if requesting a copy).

It is expected that reviewers will upload their review, in MS Word format, to ScholarOne within two months of receipt of the book. If this is not possible the Publications Editor should be notified as soon as possible at iclq@biicl.org.

Please visit www.cambridge.org/core/services/open-access-policies for information on our open access policies, compliance with major funding bodies, and guidelines on depositing your manuscript in an institutional repository.

Reviewers are asked to read the Book Review Guidance detailed below before submitting reviews or review proposals, and to adhere to the Style Guide overleaf when writing reviews.

Book Review Guidance

Reviews should normally address the following issues:

1. The structure and contents of the book.

2. The intended target audience of thebook.

3. What is the overall perspective adopted/argument advanced by the book?

4. How does this perspective/argument add to the body of existing literature in the field?

5. How convincing is the argument(s) set out by the author? A viewer might want to subject a specific chapter(s) to more detailed analysis in the light of the book's overall argument. Are there any major/minor omissions that impede/weaken the overall argument made in the book?

6. Issues of style-how clearly written/accessible is the book? (bearing in mind target audience) - how accurate is the factual material relied upon in support of the main arguments?

7. Does the author succeed in doing what he/she set out to do? How is the book likely to be viewed by members of the target audience?

ICLQ Book Review Style Guide

1. Layout

• All book reviews should be submitted in 12-point font, single-spaced,with margins of at least 2.5 cm in Microsoft Word only (please do not submit a pdf).

• The review should be headed with the book details as follows:

Title byAUTHOR [Publisher,Year, ISBN: xxx-x-xx-xxxxxx-x,#pp, £price,h/bk (or p/bk)]

• A footnote indicated by an asterisk (*) should be appended to your name, supplying your present affiliation and including any acknowledgements that you wish to make, followed by your email address.

• Other footnotes should not be used in book reviews unless it is absolutely necessary to refer directly to another work. References to the book being reviewed should simply indicate a page or chapter number within the text. Where footnotes are used, they should follow the Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA). Footnote cues should appear after the punctuation mark.

• New paragraphs should be indented, except for the first paragraph in a section. All sentences shouldbe separated by a single space and double spaces should not be used.

• The ICLQ uses the following heading levels (nomore than two heading levels should be used in book reviews):

I. FIRST-LEVEL SUBHEADING

A. Second-level Subheading

• Quotations of fewer than three lines should be set in single quotation marks within the main text, with double quotation marks reserved for quotations within quotations. Longer quotations should begin on a new line, without quotation marks, and all the lines should be equally indented. However, the first line after the quotation extract is not indented.

2. Points of Style

• All abbreviations should be spelled out in first use with the abbreviation following in brackets, eg ‘European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)’,and should not be followed or separated by a full stop.

• Words that have become part of theEnglish language should not be italicized (adhoc, ibid,de facto,ex officio,perse,etc),but phrases in other languages should be italicized.

• Numerals should be written out up to and including ten; 11 and above should be given in figures.

• The serial comma (ie the one before ‘and’ in ‘peace, war, and defence’) should not be used.

• Words omitted from quotations should be indicated by three full stops.

• Spelling should follow the Oxford English Dictionary or the Concise Oxford Dictionary. For the ‘-ise’ / ‘-ize’sound expressed as ‘z’,use z instead of s.

• For all other points of style not covered in this guide, please refer to the Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA).

Last updated May 2021