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The Utility of Interaction Design as a Novel Tool to Improve Hand Hygiene Frequency on a Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Ward

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Johanna Blaak
Affiliation:
W21C, University of Calgary
Rachel DiMaio
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Julia Kupis
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Ross Sweetzir
Affiliation:
Cisco Systems
Conny Betuzzi
Affiliation:
Alberta Children's Hospital, Alberta Health Services
Corey Dowler
Affiliation:
Alberta Children's Hospital, Alberta Health Services
Krista McIntytre
Affiliation:
Alberta Children's Hospital, Alberta Health Services
Jaime Kaufman
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Greg Hallihan
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
John Conly
Affiliation:
Foothills Medical Centre
Joseph Vayalumkal
Affiliation:
Alberta Childrens Hospital
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Abstract

Johanna Blaak, W21C, University of Calgary; Rachel DiMaio, University of Calgary; Julia Kupis, University of Calgary; Ross Sweetzir, Cisco Systems; Conny Betuzzi, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Alberta Health Services; Corey Dowler, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Alberta Health Services; Krista McIntytre, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Alberta Health Services; Jaime Kaufman, University of Calgary; Greg Hallihan, University of Calgary; John Conly, Foothills Medical Centre; Joseph Vayalumkal, Alberta Childrens Hospital

Background: Interaction design offers a novel interventional strategy to enhance hand-hygiene compliance (HHC) and reduce hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the pediatric setting. A quality improvement initiative in collaboration with the University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services led to the implementation of a pilot project with sensor-embedded alcohol -based hand rub (ABHR) dispensers at a hematology-oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit at Alberta Children’s Hospital (ACH). Methods: Internet of things (IoT) sensors were installed in ABHR dispensers (n = 3) on the unit. Usage data were transmitted to a local server using an MQTT messaging protocol for 16 weeks. Real-time data visualization was presented on a central display next to the nursing station with 11 unique pediatric themes including dinosaurs, transportation, and Canadian animals. Data were collected with and without visualization, and frequency of use (FoU) was determined for both periods. Qualitative interviews with unit stakeholders (n = 13) were held to determine perceptions of the intervention. Results: During the first 8 weeks of the study period, the mean daily use without visualization was 47 times (SD, 14.5) versus 99 times (SD, 23.9) with visualization. When accounting for novelty, by removing the first week of data, the mean daily use was 92 (SD 19.6). The percentage increase from period 1 to period 2 was 96.6%, accounting for novelty. Qualitative interviews with stakeholders (n = 13) on the unit indicated that the intervention increased their personal awareness of hand hygiene (75%) and acted as a constant reminder to perform hand hygiene for everyone on the unit including nonclinical staff, patients, and family members (92%). Conclusions: These limited data suggest that interaction design may improve HH frequency and show promise as a tool for increased HH awareness and education. Interaction design provides a unique, innovative, and acceptable hand hygiene improvement strategy for staff, patients, and families in the pediatric inpatient setting.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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