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Six Years of Admission Screening for Carbapenemase-Producing Organisms at the NIH Clinical Center

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Robin T. Odom
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology Service, NIH Clinical Center, NIH
Michele E. Woolbert
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology Service, NIH Clinical Center, NIH
Anna F. Lau
Affiliation:
Sterility Testing Service, Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
John P. Dekker
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Angela V. Michelin
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology Service, NIH Clinical Center, NIH
MaryAnn Bordner
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology Service, NIH Clinical Center, NIH
David Henderson
Affiliation:
NIH Clinical Center, NIH
Karen M. Frank
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Tara Palmore
Affiliation:
NIH
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Abstract

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Background: Transmission of carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPO) threatens patient safety in healthcare facilities. As a result of a 2011 outbreak of blaKPC+ Klebsiella pneumoniae, the NIH Clinical Center (NIHCC) has prioritized early detection and isolation of CPO carriers, using point-prevalence surveys and targeted high-risk ward surveillance since 2011 and admission surveillance since 2013. We describe our experience over 6 years of admission surveillance. Methods: The NIHCC is a 200-bed research hospital that provides care for a highly immunocompromised patient population. From September 2013 to September 2019, perirectal swabs were ordered automatically for all patients on admission to nonbehavioral health wards. Swabs were ordered twice weekly for ICU patients, weekly in other high-risk wards, and monthly for hospital-wide point prevalence (excluding behavioral health). Patients hospitalized in the United States in the previous week or abroad in the previous 6 months were considered high risk for carriage and isolated pending results from 2 swabs. Most swabs (n = 37,526) were cultured onto HardyCHROM CRE. If gram-negative bacilli (GNB) were present, a molecular screen for carbapenemases was performed on a sweep of cultured material (day 1) pending organism isolation. GNB were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Prior to June 2019, isolates were screened by blaKPC/blaNDM PCR. Starting in June 2019, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened using the phenotypic modified carbapenem inactivation method (mCIM), reflexing to the GeneXpert CARBA-R molecular assay if positive; other GNB were tested directly with CARBA-R. Selected GNB underwent susceptibility testing (Sensititre). Whole-genome sequencing was used to assess relatedness among CPO isolates. Swabs from high-risk patients were tested directly by blaKPC PCR (n = 699) until August 2019 (most in parallel with culture) and thereafter by CARBA-R (n = 13). Results: Among 54,188 orders for perirectal swabs, 38,238 were collected from 14,497 patients (compliance 71%). Among 33 CPO-colonized patients identified from September 2013 through September 2019, 15 were identified on admission, 6 were identified in point-prevalence surveys, 8 were identified from high-risk ward surveillance, and 4 were identified from clinical cultures. Sequencing demonstrated no relatedness among CPO isolates. Although only 1.4% of patients sampled on admission were colonized with CPO, those meeting high-risk criteria were 21 times as likely to be colonized. Conclusion: Admission surveillance for CPO identified a low rate of colonization, but it detected nearly half of known CPO-colonized NIHCC patients over the past 6 years. Modest compliance with swab collection leaves room for improvement and likely results in missed instances of colonization. Although we cannot determine its effectiveness, we view our strategy as one of several key safety measures for our highly vulnerable patient population.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
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Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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