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Development of National Infection Control and Prevention Guidelines in Georgia, 2017–2019

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Lali Madzgarashvili
Affiliation:
TEPHINET, Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention
Jamine Weiss
Affiliation:
US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention
Marina Baidauri
Affiliation:
Ministry of Internally Displaced Persons from the Occupied Territories, Labor, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia
Marika Geleishvili
Affiliation:
US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention South Caucasus Office
Meghan Lyman
Affiliation:
US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention
Amy Kolwaite
Affiliation:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Abstract

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Background: In 2015, the Ministry of Internally Displaced Persons from the Occupied Territories, Labor, Health and Social Affairs (MoLHSA) of Georgia identified infection prevention and control (IPC) as a top priority. Infection control legislation was adopted and compliance was made mandatory for licensure. Participation in the universal healthcare system requires facilities to have an IPC program and infrastructure. To support facilities to improve IPC, MoLHSA and the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC) requested assistance from the US CDC to revise the 2009 National IPC guidelines, which were translated versions of international guidelines and not adapted to the Georgian context. Methods: An IPC guideline technical working group (TWG), comprising clinical epidemiologists, IPC nurses, head nurses, and infectious diseases doctors from the NCDC, academic and healthcare organizations and the CDC was formed to lead the development of the national IPC guidelines. Additionally, an IPC steering committee was established to review and verify the guidelines’ compliance with applicable decrees and regulations. The TWG began work in April 2017 and was divided into 4 subgroups, each responsible for developing specific guideline topics. A general IPC guideline template for low- and middle-income countries was used to develop 7 of the guidelines. Additional reference materials and international guidelines were used to develop all the guidelines. Drafts were shared with the subgroups and the steering committee during 2 workshops to discuss unresolved technical issues and to validate the guidelines. Results: The revised guidelines consist of 18 topics. In addition to standard precautions (eg, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, injection safety, etc) and transmission-based precautions, the guideline topics include laundry, environmental cleaning and disinfection, decontamination and sterilization, occupational health and safety, biosafety in clinical laboratory, blood bank and transfusion services, intensive care unit, emergency room, and mortuary. They do not include healthcare-associated infection surveillance or organism-specific guidance. To supplement the guidelines, a separate implementation manual was developed. The guidelines were approved by MoLHSA in October 2019. The TWG continues to be engaged in IPC activities, assisting with guideline rollout, training, and monitoring, and drafting the National IPC strategy and action plans. Conclusions: The Georgian Ministry of Health developed national IPC guidelines using local experts. This model can be replicated in other low- and middle-income countries that lack country-specific IPC guidelines. It can also be adapted to develop facility-level guidelines and standard operating procedures.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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