Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-lwxm7 Total loading time: 0.199 Render date: 2021-06-19T07:40:44.606Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Clostridium difficile Colitis in the Hospital Setting: A Potentially Explosive Problem

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Charles W. Stratton
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Clinical Microbiology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.
Type
Editorial
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1990

References

1.Coats, J. A Manual of Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Henry C. Lea's Sons; 1883.Google Scholar
2.Finney, JMTGastroenterostomy for cicatrizing ulcer of the pylorus. Bull Johns Hopkins Hasp. 1893;4:5354.Google Scholar
3.Reiner, L, Schlesinger, MJ, Miller, GM. Pseudo-membranous colitis following aureomycin and chloramphenicol. Arch Pathol. 1952;54:3967.Google Scholar
4.Dearing, WH, Baggenstoss, AH, Weed, LA. Studies on the relationship of Staphylococcus aureus to pseudomembranous enteritis and to postantibiotic enteritis. Gastroenterology. 1960;38:441451.Google ScholarPubMed
5.Bennett, IL, Wood, JS, Yardley, JH. Staphylococcal psuedomembraneous enterocolitis in chinchillas: a clinico-pathologic study. Trans Assoc Am Physicians. 1956;69:116121.Google ScholarPubMed
6.Hardaway, RM, McKay, DG. Pseudomembranous enterocolitis: are antibiotics wholly responsible? Arch Surg. 1959;78:457466.Google ScholarPubMed
7.Larson, HE, Parry, JV, Price, AB, et al.Undescribed toxin in pseudomembranous colitis. Br Med J. 1977;1:12461248.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Small, JD. Fatal enterocolitis in hamsters given lincomycin hydrochloride. Laboratory Animal Care. 1968;18:411420.Google ScholarPubMed
9.Bartlett, JG, Chang, TW, Gurwith, M, Gorbach, SL, Onderdonk, AB. Antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis due to toxin-producing Clostridia. N Eng J Med. 1978;298:531534.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.George, RH. Symonds, JM, Dimock, F, et al.Identification of Clostridium difficile as a cause of pseudomembranous colitis. Br Med J. 1978;1:695.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Bartlett, JG, Chang, TW, Taylor, NS, Onderdonk, AB. Colitis induced by Clostridium difficile. Reu Infect Dis. 1979;1:370378.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12.Hall, IC, O'Toole, E. Intestinal flora in new-born infants with a description of a new pathogenic anaerobe, Bacillus difficilis. Am J Dis Child. 1935;49:390402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Snyder, ML. Rirther studies on Bacillus difficilis. J Infect Dis. 1937;60:223231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Silva, J. Fekety, R, Werk, C, et al.Inciting and etiologie agents of colitis. Rev Infect Dis. 1984;6(suppl):214221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Kabins, SA. Outbreak of clindamycin-associated colitis. Ann Intern Med. 1975;83:830831.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16.Kim, KH, Fekety, R, Batts, DH, et al.Isolation of Clostridium difficile from the environment and contacts of patients with antibiotic-associated colitis. J Infect Dis. 1981;143:4250.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
17.McFarland, LV, Mulligan, M, Kwok, RYY, Stamm, WE. Nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection. N Engl J Med. 1989;320:204210.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18.O'Keefe, JP, Venezio, FR. Divincenzo, CA. Shatzer, KL. Activity of newer ß-lactam. agents against clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis and other Bacteroides species. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1987;31:20022004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Clostridium difficile Colitis in the Hospital Setting: A Potentially Explosive Problem
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Clostridium difficile Colitis in the Hospital Setting: A Potentially Explosive Problem
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Clostridium difficile Colitis in the Hospital Setting: A Potentially Explosive Problem
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *