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Use of diagnostic and antimicrobial stewardship practices to improve Clostridioides difficile testing among SHEA Research Network hospitals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 August 2021

Kaede V. Sullivan*
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Jason C. Gallagher
Affiliation:
Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Surbhi Leekha
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Daniel J. Morgan
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Kazumi Morita
Affiliation:
Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Clare Rock
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Kimberly C. Claeys
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland
*
Author for correspondence: Kaede V. Sullivan, E-mail: kaede.ota@tuhs.temple.edu

Abstract

We surveyed acute-care hospitals on strategies to reduce inappropriate C. difficile testing and treatment of colonized patients. Decision support during C. difficile test ordering was common, but “hard stops” to prevent placement of inappropriate orders and active intervention of antimicrobial stewardship programs on positive C. difficile test reports were infrequent.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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References

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