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Trends in Antibacterial Use in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients in United States Academic Health Centers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Amy L. Pakyz
Affiliation:
School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond
Holly E. Gurgle
Affiliation:
School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond
Omar M. Ibrahim
Affiliation:
School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond
Michael J. Oinonen
Affiliation:
University HealthSystem Consortium, Oak Brook, Illinois
Ronald E. Polk
Affiliation:
School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Trends in pediatric antibacterial use were examined in 20 academic health centers during the period 2002-2007. There was a significant increase in the use of linezolid (P < .001) and of macrolides (P = .001) and a significant decrease in the use of aminoglycosides (P < .001) and of first-generation cephalosporins (P < .001).

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2009

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References

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