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Sustained reduction in catheter-associated urinary tract infections using multi-faceted strategies led by champions: A quality improvement initiative

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2021

Staci S. Reynolds*
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina Duke University Hospital, Infection Prevention and Hospital Epidemiology, Durham, North Carolina
Chris D. Sova
Affiliation:
Duke University Hospital, Infection Prevention and Hospital Epidemiology, Durham, North Carolina
Sarah S. Lewis
Affiliation:
Duke University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina
Becky A. Smith
Affiliation:
Duke University Hospital, Infection Prevention and Hospital Epidemiology, Durham, North Carolina Duke University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina
Rebekah H. Wrenn
Affiliation:
Duke University Hospital, Infection Prevention and Hospital Epidemiology, Durham, North Carolina Duke University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina
Nicholas A. Turner
Affiliation:
Duke University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina Duke Infection Control Outreach Network, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Sonali D. Advani
Affiliation:
Duke University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina Duke Infection Control Outreach Network, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Staci S. Reynolds, E-mail: Staci.reynolds@duke.edu

Abstract

We reviewed the sustainability of a multifaceted intervention on catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in 3 intensive care units. During the 4-year postintervention period, we observed reductions in urine culture rates (from 80.9 to 47.5 per 1,000 patient days; P < .01), catheter utilization (from 0.68 to 0.58; P < .01), and CAUTI incidence rates (from 1.7 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient days; P = .16).

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: This work was presented as an abstract at the Duke Quality & Patient Safety Conference on March 23, 2017, March 22, 2018, and March 21, 2019, in Durham, North Carolina.

References

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