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A Survey of Infection Prevention and Control Practices among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Centers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2015

Elena Beam*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Michael R. Keating
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota The William J von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Raymund R. Razonable*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota The William J von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
*
Address correspondence to Elena Beam, MD, Mayo Clinic, Infectious Disease, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (beam.elena@mayo.edu) or Raymund Razonable, MD Mayo Clinic, Infectious Disease, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (razonable.raymund@mayo.edu).
Address correspondence to Elena Beam, MD, Mayo Clinic, Infectious Disease, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (beam.elena@mayo.edu) or Raymund Razonable, MD Mayo Clinic, Infectious Disease, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (razonable.raymund@mayo.edu).

Abstract

This survey of the American Society of Transplantation Infectious Disease Community of Practice demonstrates variations in clinical practices among hematopoietic stem cell transplant centers on selected infection prevention and control practices. Our findings highlight a need and emphasize an opportunity to optimize patient care through standardization of practices in this vulnerable population.

Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(3):348–351

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

REFERENCES

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