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A survey of infection control strategies for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Department of Veterans’ Affairs facilities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2020

Swetha Ramanathan*
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Center of Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois
Katie J. Suda
Affiliation:
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Health Care System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Margaret A. Fitzpatrick
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Center of Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois
Marylou Guihan
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Center of Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
Cassie Cunningham Goedken
Affiliation:
Center for Comprehensive Access Delivery & Research, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa
Nasia Safdar
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, William S. Middleton Memorial VA Medical Center, Madison, Wisconsin Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Wisconsin School of Public Health and Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin
Martin Evans
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Lexington VA Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky
Makoto Jones
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System, Salt Lake City, Utah Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Christopher D. Pfeiffer
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Portland VA Health Care System, Portland, Oregon Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA
Eli N. Perencevich
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
Michael Rubin
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, VA Salt Lake City Healthcare System, Salt Lake City, Utah Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Charlesnika T. Evans
Affiliation:
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Center of Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, Illinois Center for Healthcare Studies and Department of Preventive Medicine Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
*
Author for correspondence: Swetha Ramanathan, E-mail: Swetha.Ramanathan@va.gov

Abstract

A survey of Veterans’ Affairs Medical Centers on control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and carbapenem-producing CRE (CP-CRE) demonstrated that most facilities use VA guidelines but few screen for CRE/CP-CRE colonization regularly or regularly communicate CRE/CP-CRE status at patient transfer. Most respondents were knowledgeable about CRE guidelines but cited lack of adequate resources.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic Resistant Threats in the United States, 2019. Atlanta: CDC; 2019.Google Scholar
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