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Surveillance for Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection in Hematology Units: Quantifying the Characteristics of a Practical Case Definition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Leon J. Worth*
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Centre for Clinical Research Excellence Infectious Diseases, Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
James Black
Affiliation:
Centre for Clinical Research Excellence Infectious Diseases, Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
John F. Seymour
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
Karin A. Thursky
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Centre for Clinical Research Excellence Infectious Diseases, Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Monica A. Slavin
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Centre for Clinical Research Excellence Infectious Diseases, Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
*
Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St. Andrew's Place, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 3002 (leon.worth@petermac.org)

Abstract

We evaluated 66 patients in a hematology unit, who used a total of 106 central venous catheters (CVCs), to identify CVC-associated bloodstream infections using standard and modified surveillance case definitions. Compared with the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system criteria, a modified case definition used by treating physicians demonstrated 100.0% sensitivity and 94.3% specificity. This case definition provides a practical method for effectively excluding CVC-associated bloodstream infection.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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References

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