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Surgeon choice in the use of postdischarge antibiotics for prophylaxis following mastectomy with and without breast reconstruction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2020

David K. Warren
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Katelin B. Nickel
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Christopher J. Hostler
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina Infectious Diseases Section, Durham VA Health Care System, Durham, North Carolina
Katherine Foy
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Jennifer H. Han
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Present affiliation: GlaxoSmithKline, Rockville, Maryland
Pam Tolomeo
Affiliation:
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Ian R. Banks
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Victoria J. Fraser
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Margaret A. Olsen*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
*
Author for correspondence: Margaret A. Olsen, E-mail: molsen@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Multiple guidelines recommend discontinuation of prophylactic antibiotics <24 hours after surgery. In a multicenter, retrospective cohort of 2,954 mastectomy patients ± immediate breast reconstruction, we found that utilization of prophylactic postdischarge antibiotics varied dramatically at the surgeon level among general surgeons and was virtually universal among plastic surgeons.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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References

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