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Spiking of intravenous bags does not cause time-dependent microbial contamination: a preliminary report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 August 2018

John G. Brock-Utne
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Sara C. Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Niaz Banaei
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Shao-Ching Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Diane Alejandro-Harper
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Richard A. Jaffe
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Research Brief
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Brock-Utne JG, et al. (2018). Spiking of intravenous bags does not cause time-dependent microbial contamination: a preliminary report. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2018, 39, 1129–1130. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.143

References

1. Pharmaceutical compounding—sterile preparations. In: US Pharmacopeia, chapter 797. Rockville, MD: The United States Pharmacopeia Convention; 2011.Google Scholar
2. Dolan, SA, Felizerda, G, Barnes, S, et al. APIC position paper: safe injection, infusion, and medication vital practices in health care. Am J Infect Control 2010;38:167172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Stedman, JL, Yarmush, JM, Joshi, MC, Kamath, S, Schianodicola, J. How long is too long? The prespiked intravenous debate. Anesth Analg 2017;124:15641568.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Haas, R, Beitz, E, Reed, A, et al. No bacterial growth found in spiked intravenous fluids over an 8-hour period. Am J Infect Control 2017;45:448450.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. Guynn, JB, Poretz, DM, Duma, RJ. Growth of various bacteria in a variety of intravenous fluids. Amer J Hosp Pharm 1973;30:321325.Google Scholar

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