Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-fg2fv Total loading time: 0.146 Render date: 2021-10-23T02:41:34.843Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroconversion and occupational exposure of employees at a Swiss university hospital: A large longitudinal cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 March 2021

Romain Martischang*
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Anne Iten
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Isabelle Arm
Affiliation:
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Diagnostics, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Mohamed Abbas
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Benjamin Meyer
Affiliation:
Center for Vaccinology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Sabine Yerly
Affiliation:
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Diagnostics, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
Isabella Eckerle
Affiliation:
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Diagnostics, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland Geneva Center for Emerging Viral Diseases, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
Jacques Pralong
Affiliation:
Occupational Health Service, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland Pulmonary Division, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
Julien Sauser
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Jean-Claude Suard
Affiliation:
Occupational Health Service, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
Laurent Kaiser
Affiliation:
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Diagnostics, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland Geneva Center for Emerging Viral Diseases, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland
Didier Pittet
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Stephan Harbarth
Affiliation:
Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
*
Author for correspondence: Romain Martischang, E-mail: romain.martischang@hcuge.ch

Abstract

Background:

The dynamics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) seroconversion of hospital employees are understudied. We measured the proportion of seroconverted employees and evaluated risk factors for seroconversion during the first pandemic wave.

Methods:

In this prospective cohort study, we recruited Geneva University Hospitals employees and sampled them 3 times, every 3 weeks from March 30 to June 12, 2020. We measured the proportion of seroconverted employees and determined prevalence ratios of risk factors for seroconversion using multivariate mixed-effects Poisson regression models.

Results:

Overall, 3,421 participants (29% of all employees) were included, with 92% follow-up. The proportion of seroconverted employees increased from 4.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7%–5.1%) at baseline to 8.5% [(95% CI, 7.6%–9.5%) at the last visit. The proportions of seroconverted employees working in COVID-19 geriatrics and rehabilitation (G&R) wards (32.3%) and non–COVID-19 G&R wards (12.3%) were higher compared to office workers (4.9%) at the last visit. Only nursing assistants had a significantly higher risk of seroconversion compared to office workers (11.7% vs 4.9%; P = .006). Significant risk factors for seroconversion included the use of public transportation (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.25–2.03), known community exposure to severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (2.80; 95% CI, 2.22–3.54), working in a ward with a nosocomial COVID outbreak (2.93; 95% CI, 2.27–3.79), and working in a COVID-19 G&R ward (3.47; 95% CI, 2.45–4.91) or a non–COVID-19 G&R ward (1.96; 95% CI, 1.46–2.63). We observed an association between reported use of respirators and lower risk of seroconversion (0.73; 95% CI, 0.55–0.96).

Conclusion:

Additional preventive measures should be implemented to protect employees in G&R wards. Randomized trials on the protective effect of respirators are urgently needed.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Grant, R, Malik, MR, Elkholy, A, Van Kerkhove, MD. A review of asymptomatic and subclinical Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections. Epidemiol Rev 2019;41:6981.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jung, C-Y, Park, H, Kim, DW, et al. Clinical characteristics of asymptomatic patients with COVID-19: a nationwide cohort study in South Korea. Int J Infect Dis 2020;99:266268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garcia-Basteiro, AL, Moncunill, G, Tortajada, M, et al. Seroprevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 among healthcare workers in a large Spanish reference hospital. Nat Commun 2020;11:3500.Google Scholar
Sotgiu, G, Barassi, A, Miozzo, M, et al. SARS-CoV-2–specific serological pattern in healthcare workers of an Italian COVID-19 forefront hospital. BMC Pulm Med 2020;20:203.Google ScholarPubMed
Moscola, J, Sembajwe, G, Jarrett, M, et al. Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in health care personnel in the New York City Area. JAMA 2020;324:893895.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grant, JJ, Wilmore, SMS, McCann, NS, et al. Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in healthcare workers at a London NHS Trust. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2020;42:212214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pollán, M, Pérez-Gómez, B, Pastor-Barriuso, R, et al. Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Spain (ENE-COVID): a nationwide, population-based seroepidemiological study. Lancet 2020;396:535544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stringhini, S, Wisniak, A, Piumatti, G, et al. Seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies in Geneva, Switzerland (SEROCoV-POP): a population-based study. Lancet 2020;396:313319.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Elm E von, Altman, DG, Egger, M, et al. Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies. BMJ 2007;335:806808.Google Scholar
Human resources: key figures at HUG in Geneva. Geneva University Hospitals website. https://www.hug.ch/en/chiffres-cles-2017/human-resources. Published 2017. Accessed September 1, 2020.Google Scholar
Facts, figures, and dates. Geneva University Hospitals website. https://www.hug.ch/en/facts-figures-and-dates. Published 2018. Accessed Sept 1, 2020.Google Scholar
Geneva University Hospitals. VigiGerme website. https://vigigerme.hug.ch/. Published August 12, 2020. Accessed March 2, 2021.Google Scholar
Zou, G. A modified Poisson regression approach to prospective studies with binary data. Am J Epidemiol 2004;159:702706.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zou, G, Donner, A. Extension of the modified Poisson regression model to prospective studies with correlated binary data. Stat Methods Med Res 2013;22:661670.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sinclair, JC, Bracken, MB. Clinically useful measures of effect in binary analyses of randomized trials. J Clin Epidemiol 1994;47:881889.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arora, RK, Joseph, A, Wyk, JV, et al. SeroTracker: a global SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence dashboard. Lancet Infect Dis 2020;21:e75–e76. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30631-9.Google Scholar
Mizumoto, K, Kagaya, K, Zarebski, A, et al. Estimating the asymptomatic proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020. Eurosurveillance 2020;25(10):2000180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mendes, A, Serratrice, C, Herrmann, FR, et al. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in older patients with COVID-19: the COVIDAge study. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2020;21:15461554.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pagani, L, Thomas, Y, Huttner, B, et al. Transmission and effect of multiple clusters of seasonal influenza in a Swiss geriatric hospital. J Am Geriatr Soc 2015;63:739744.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costa, SF, Giavina-Bianchi, P, Buss, L, et al. SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and risk factors among oligo/asymptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs): estimating the impact of community transmission. Clin Infect Dis 2020;13:ciaa1845. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa1845.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Safdar, N, Moreno, GK, Braun, KM, et al. Using virus sequencing to determine source of SARS-CoV-2 transmission for healthcare worker. Emerg Infect Dis 2020;26:24892491.Google ScholarPubMed
Sikkema, RS, Pas, SD, Nieuwenhuijse, DF, et al. COVID-19 in health-care workers in three hospitals in the south of the Netherlands: a cross-sectional study. Lancet Infect Dis 2020;20:1273–80.Google ScholarPubMed
Olmos, C, Campaña, G, Monreal, V, et al. SARS-CoV-2 infection in asymptomatic healthcare workers at a clinic in Chile. PloS One 2021;16:e0245913.Google Scholar
Kelcikova, S, Mazuchova, L, Bielena, L, Filova, L. Flawed self-assessment in hand hygiene: a major contributor to infections in clinical practice? J Clin Nurs 2019;28:22652275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: PDF

Martischang et al. supplementary material

Martischang et al. supplementary material

Download Martischang et al. supplementary material(PDF)
PDF 2 MB
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroconversion and occupational exposure of employees at a Swiss university hospital: A large longitudinal cohort study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroconversion and occupational exposure of employees at a Swiss university hospital: A large longitudinal cohort study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroconversion and occupational exposure of employees at a Swiss university hospital: A large longitudinal cohort study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *