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Pseudo-outbreak of Mycobacterium chimaera through aerators of hand-washing machines at a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2019

Shingen Nakamura*
Affiliation:
Department of Hematology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan
Momoyo Azuma
Affiliation:
Division of Infection Control, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan
Masami Sato
Affiliation:
Division of Infection Control, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan
Noriko Fujiwara
Affiliation:
Division of Medical Technology, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan
Saori Nishino
Affiliation:
Division of Medical Technology, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan
Takayuki Wada
Affiliation:
Department of International Health and Medical Anthropology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan Nagasaki University School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki, Japan
Shiomi Yoshida
Affiliation:
Department of International Health and Medical Anthropology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, Sakai, Osaka, Japan
*
Author for correspondence: Shingen Nakamura, Email: shingen@tokushima-u.ac.jp

Abstract

We identified a waterborne pseudo-outbreak of Mycobacterium chimaera in our stem cell transplantation center, which likely resulted from biofilm on the aerators of the handwashing machines in each patient’s room. Regular replacement of faucet parts can prevent biofilm formation and pseudo-outbreaks of M. chimaera through aerators.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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References

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