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Protecting Healthcare Personnel from Acquiring Ebola Virus Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 September 2015

David J. Weber*
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
William A. Fischer II
Affiliation:
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
David A. Wohl
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
William A. Rutala
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
*
Address correspondence to David J. Weber, MD, MPH, 2163 Bioinformatics, CB #7030, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7030 (dweber@unch.unc.edu).

Abstract

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Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

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