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The Prevalence of Fecal Colonization With VRE Among Residents of Long-Term–Care Facilities in Melbourne, Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Alexander A. Padiglione*
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Epidemiology, Monash Medical Center, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Elizabeth Grabsch
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Epidemiology, Monash Medical Center, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Rory Wolfe
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Kimberly Gibson
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Epidemiology, Monash Medical Center, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
M. Lindsay Grayson
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Epidemiology, Monash Medical Center, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
*
Infectious Diseases and Clinical Epidemiology Department, Monash Medical Center, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia

Abstract

A point-prevalence survey performed among residents of eight nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia, found a rate of fecal VRE colonization of 3.1% (9/292; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.1), all vanB Enterococcusfaecium. This is a higher rate than in the general community (3.1% vs 0.2%). Many residents (16%) had been inpatients in acute-care hospitals in the previous 3 months.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2001

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References

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