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Patient Hand Colonization With MDROs Is Associated with Environmental Contamination in Post-Acute Care

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 July 2017

Payal K. Patel*
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Julia Mantey
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lona Mody*
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
*
Address correspondence to Payal K. Patel, MD, MPH, Infectious Disease Clinic, University of Michigan, Taubman Center Floor 3 Reception D, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr. SPC 5352, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (payalkp@umich.edu) or Lona Mody, MD, MSc, Division of Geriatric and Palliative Care Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, 300 N. Ingalls Rd, Rm 905, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (lonamody@umich.edu).
Address correspondence to Payal K. Patel, MD, MPH, Infectious Disease Clinic, University of Michigan, Taubman Center Floor 3 Reception D, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr. SPC 5352, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (payalkp@umich.edu) or Lona Mody, MD, MSc, Division of Geriatric and Palliative Care Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, 300 N. Ingalls Rd, Rm 905, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (lonamody@umich.edu).

Abstract

We assessed multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) patient hand colonization in relation to the environment in post-acute care to determine risk factors for MDRO hand colonization. Patient hand colonization was significantly associated with environmental contamination. Risk factors for hand colonization included disability, urinary catheter, recent antibiotic use, and prolonged hospital stay.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1110–1113

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2017 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

REFERENCES

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Supplementary material: File

Patel supplementary material

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