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Nosocomial Dermatophytosis Caused by Microsporum canis in a Newborn Department

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

M. Mossovitch
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, Negev Region, Kupat Holim; and Institute for Infectious Diseases, Soroka Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
B. Mossovitch
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, Negev Region, Kupat Holim; and Institute for Infectious Diseases, Soroka Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
M. Alkan*
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, Negev Region, Kupat Holim; and Institute for Infectious Diseases, Soroka Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
*
Soroka Medical Center, P.O.B. 151, Beer Sheva, Israel

Abstract

Seven nurses working in a newborn unit were infested by Microsporum canis, involving the skin of the left forearm. One infant who was treated in the same unit suffered from a similar lesion on the occipital region. Transmission during bottle feeding was suspected. After the introduction of long sleeves for all nurses, no further cases occurred. Data collected on the nurses in the unit suggested that infection correlated with direct exposure to infants.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1986

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References

1. Maki, DG, Wenzel, RP: Handbook of Hospital Acquired Infection. Boca Raton, Florida, CRC Press Inc., 1981; p 422.Google Scholar
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3. Nakajima, H: Color Atlas of Microscopic Findings in the Direct Examination for the Diagnosis of Skin Diseases. Osaka, Japan, Yakuhim Press, 1982; p 70.Google Scholar
4. Frey, D, Oldfield, R, Bridger, R: A Color Atlas of Pathogenic Fungi. Wolfe Medical Publishers, 1979; p 27.Google Scholar
5. Bruck, HM, Nash, G, Stein, JM, et al; Studies on the occurrence and significance of yeasts and fungi in the burn wound. Ann Surg 1971; 176:108110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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