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Mortality Attributable to Hospital-Acquired Infections Among Surgical Patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Christine Geffers*
Affiliation:
German National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, and the Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Dorit Sohr
Affiliation:
German National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, and the Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Petra Gastmeier
Affiliation:
German National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, and the Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
*
Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Heubnerweg 6 (Haus II), 14059 Berlin, Germany (christine.geffers@charite.de)

Abstract

We performed a multicenter prospective matched cohort study to evaluate the mortality attributable to hospital-acquired infections among 12,791 patients admitted to surgical departments. We were able to match 731 patients with 1 or more hospital-acquired infections (ie, case patients) with 731 patients without a hospital-acquired infection (ie, control patients) at a 1 : 1 ratio. Of the 731 case patients, 42 (5.7%) died; of the 731 control patients, 23 (3.1%) died—a significant difference of 2.6%.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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