Hostname: page-component-6b989bf9dc-g5k2d Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-13T11:05:12.620Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Implementation of cleaning and evaluation process for mobile patient equipment using adenosine triphosphate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2019

Sara M. Reese*
Affiliation:
Department of Quality Management, Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, Colorado
Bryan C. Knepper
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety and Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Jennifer Kurtz
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety and Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
D. Christy LeQuire
Affiliation:
Department of Nursing, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Tina Van Winks
Affiliation:
Department of Nursing, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Jennifer Bonn
Affiliation:
Department of Nursing, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Heather L. Young
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado
*
Author for correspondence: Sara M. Reese, Email: Sara.reese@healthonecares.com

Abstract

We implemented a cleaning process for mobile patient equipment (MPE) and determined its success using adenosine trisphosphate (ATP) monitoring and data feedback. Following education for staff and ATP data feedback, the data suggest that the MPE cleaning program we implemented was successful.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Boyce, JM. Environmental contamination makes an important contribution to hospital infection. J Hosp Infect 2007;65 suppl 2:5054.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huang, SS, Datta, R, Platt, R. Risk of acquiring antibiotic-resistant bacteria from prior room occupants. Arch Intern Med 2006;166:19451951.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scott, D, Kane, H, Rankin, A. ‘Time to clean’: a systematic review and observational study on the time required to clean items of reusable communal patient care equipment. J Infect Prev 2017;18:289294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jinadatha, C, Villamaria, FC, Coppin, JD, et al. Interaction of healthcare worker hands and portable medical equipment: a sequence analysis to show potential transmission opportunities. BMC Infect Dis 2017;17:800.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boyce, JM, Havill, NL, Havill, HL, Mangione, E, Dumigan, DG, Moore, BA. Comparison of fluorescent marker systems with 2 quantitative methods of assessing terminal cleaning practices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2011;32:11871193.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boyce, JM, Havill, NL, Dumigan, DG, Golebiewski, M, Balogun, O, Rizvani, R. Monitoring the effectiveness of hospital cleaning practices by use of an adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2009;30:678684.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Knape, L, Hambraeus, A, Lytsy, B. The adenosine triphosphate method as a quality control tool to assess ‘cleanliness’ of frequently touched hospital surfaces. J Hosp Infect 2015;91:166170.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, PW, Beam, E, Sayles, H, et al. Impact of adenosine triphosphate detection and feedback on hospital room cleaning. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;35:564569.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frota, OP, Ferreira, AM, Koch, R, et al. Surface cleaning effectiveness in a walk-in emergency care unit: influence of a multifaceted intervention. Am J Infect Control 2016;44:15721577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar