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Impact of Surveillance Technique on Reported Rates of Surgical Site Infection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2015

Heather Young*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado, Denver
Sara M. Reese
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety & Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver.
Bryan Knepper
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety & Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver.
Connie S. Price
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado, Denver
*
Address correspondence to Heather Young, MD, 660 Bannock St., MC 4000, Denver CO 80204 (heather.young2@dhha.org).

Abstract

Surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance methods vary among infection preventionists. An online survey regarding SSI surveillance technique was administered to infection preventionists and linked to superficial and complex colon SSI rates. Higher superficial but not complex SSI rates were reported when more SSI surveillance techniques were used (P <.0001).

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0): 1–3

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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Footnotes

Presented in part: SHEA Spring 2014 Conference; Denver, Colorado; April 4, 2014.

References

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