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Impact of an electronic hard-stop clinical decision support tool to limit repeat Clostridioides difficile toxin enzyme immunoassay testing on test utilization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2019

Jennie H. Kwon*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Kimberly A. Reske
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Tiffany Hink
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Ronald Jackups Jr
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Carey-Ann D. Burnham
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
Erik R. Dubberke
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
*
Author for correspondence: Jennie H. Kwon, DO, MSCI, E-mail: j.kwon@wustl.edu

Abstract

We performed an intervention evaluating the impact of an electronic hard-stop clinical decision support tool on repeat Clostridioides difficile (CD) toxin enzyme immunoassay (T-EIA) testing. The CD testing rate and number of admissions with repeat tests decreased significantly postintervention (P < .01 for both); the percentage of positive tests was unchanged (P = .27).

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. These data were presented in part as an abstract (no. 2086) at IDWeek 2016 on October 29, 2016, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

References

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Impact of an electronic hard-stop clinical decision support tool to limit repeat Clostridioides difficile toxin enzyme immunoassay testing on test utilization
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