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How frequently are hospitalized patients colonized with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) already on contact precautions for other indications?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2018

Katherine E. Goodman
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Patricia J. Simner
Affiliation:
Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Eili Y. Klein
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy, Washington, DC
Abida Q. Kazmi
Affiliation:
Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Avinash Gadala
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Clare Rock
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Pranita D. Tamma
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Sara E. Cosgrove
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa L. Maragakis
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
for the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy, Washington, DC Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
the CDC MIND-Healthcare Program
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland The Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy, Washington, DC Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Corresponding

Abstract

Using samples collected for VRE surveillance, we evaluated unit admission prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) perirectal colonization and whether CRE carriers (unknown to staff) were on contact precautions for other indications. CRE colonization at unit admission was infrequent (3.9%). Most CRE carriers were not on contact precautions, representing a reservoir for healthcare-associated CRE transmission.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Goodman KE, et al. (2018). How frequently are hospitalized patients colonized with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) already on contact precautions for other indications? Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2018, 39, 1491–1493. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.236

References

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How frequently are hospitalized patients colonized with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) already on contact precautions for other indications?
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