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Hepatitis B Immunoprophylaxis: Developing a Cost-Effective Program in the Hospital Setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Bruce P. Lanphear*
Affiliation:
Medical Center Health Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
*
Medical Center Heath Services, Mail Location #705, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267

Extract

There are several goals of a hepatitis B immunoprophylaxis program. Prevention of clinical disease and carrier status in healthcare workers (HCW) is the primary goal. In addition, the uncommon incidence of staff transmitting hepatitis B infection (HBV) to patients should not continue with available methods of prevention. The prevention of disease is not only desirable from a public health standpoint, it is also needed to protect health centers from liability that may result from the occurrence of preventable diseases of occupational origin, such as HBV.

Type
Readers' Forum
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1990

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