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Healthcare-Associated Infections among Patients in a Large Burn Intensive Care Unit: Incidence and Pathogens, 2008–2012

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2016

David J. Weber*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
David van Duin
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Lauren M. DiBiase
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Charles Scott Hultman
Affiliation:
Division of Plastic Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Samuel W. Jones
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Anne M. Lachiewicz
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Emily E. Sickbert-Bennett
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Rebecca H. Brooks
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Bruce A. Cairns
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
William A. Rutala
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
*
MPH, 2163 Bioinformatics, CB #7030, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7030 (dweber@unch.unc.edu).

Abstract

Burn injuries are a common source of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with an estimated 450,000 burn injuries requiring medical treatment, 40,000 requiring hospitalization, and 3,400 deaths from burns annually in the United States. Patients with severe burns are at high risk for local and systemic infections. Furthermore, burn patients are immunosuppressed, as thermal injury results in less phagocytic activity and lymphokine production by macrophages. In recent years, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens have become major contributors to morbidity and mortality in burn patients.

Since only limited data are available on the incidence of both device- and nondevice-associated healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in burn patients, we undertook this retrospective cohort analysis of patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit (ICU) from 2008 to 2012.

Type
Research Briefs
Copyright
© 2014 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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References

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