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Genotypic Evolution of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains in an Outbreak Associated With War Trauma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Glenn Wortmann*
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Amy Weintrob
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland
Melissa Barber
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland
Paul Scott
Affiliation:
Division of Retrovirology, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Rockville, Maryland
Scott T. Zoll
Affiliation:
Ibis Biosciences, a subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Carlsbad, California
Mark W. Eshoo
Affiliation:
Ibis Biosciences, a subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Carlsbad, California
Rangarajan Sampath
Affiliation:
Ibis Biosciences, a subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Carlsbad, California
David J. Ecker
Affiliation:
Ibis Biosciences, a subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Carlsbad, California
Christian Massire
Affiliation:
Ibis Biosciences, a subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Carlsbad, California
*
Infectious Disease Clinic, 6900 Georgia Ave., NW, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307–5001 (glenn.wortmann@amedd.army.mil)

Abstract

The Walter Reed Army Medical Center has experienced an influx of traumatically injured patients either infected or colonized with Acinetobacter baumannii. Using multilocus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mass spectrometry to genotype isolates, we found an atypical and evolving strain distribution, distinct from those found at nonmilitary hospitals in the United States.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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References

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