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Evaluation of environmental cleaning of patient rooms: Impact of different fluorescent gel markers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 November 2018

Clare Rock
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Anping Xie
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland
Jennifer Andonian
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Yea-Jen Hsu
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Patience Osei
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland
Sara C. Keller
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Ayse P. Gurses
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland
Polly Trexler
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa L Maragakis
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Sara E. Cosgrove
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
for the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

Abstract

In this systematic evaluation of fluorescent gel markers (FGM) applied to high-touch surfaces with a metered applicator (MA) made for the purpose versus a generic cotton swab (CS), removal rates were 60.5% (476 of 787) for the MA and 64.3% (506 of 787) for the CS. MA-FGM removal interpretation was more consistent, 83% versus 50% not removed, possibly due to less varied application and more adhesive gel.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Rock C, et al. (2019). Evaluation of environmental cleaning of patient rooms: Impact of different fluorescent gel markers. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2019, 40, 100–102. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.287

References

1. Han, JH, Sullivan, N, Leas, BF, Pegues, DA, Kaczmarek, JL, Umscheid, CA. Cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent health care–associated infections. Ann Intern Med 2015;163:598607.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. Kenters, N, Gottlieb, T, Hopman, J, et al. An international survey of cleaning and disinfection practices in the healthcare environment. J Hosp Infect 2018. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2018.05.008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Options for evaluating environmental cleaning. Toolkits: Preventing HAIs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/hai/toolkits/Evaluating-Environmental-Cleaning.html. Published 2010. Accessed October 13, 2015.Google Scholar
4. Vickery, K, Deva, A, Jacombs, A, Allan, J, Valente, P, Gosbell, IB. Presence of biofilm containing viable multiresistant organisms despite terminal cleaning on clinical surfaces in an intensive care unit. J Hosp Infect 2012;80:5255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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