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Evaluating State-Specific Antibiotic Resistance Measures Derived from Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections, National Healthcare Safety Network, 2011

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2015

Minn M. Soe*
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
Jonathan R. Edwards
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
Dawn M. Sievert
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
Philip M. Ricks
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
Shelley S. Magill
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
Scott K. Fridkin
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, Georgia
*
Address correspondence to Minn M. Soe, MD, MPH, MS A-24, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30333 (msoe@cdc.gov).

Abstract

DISCLOSURE

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry.

OBJECTIVE

Describe the impact of standardizing state-specific summary measures of antibiotic resistance that inform regional interventions to reduce transmission of resistant pathogens in healthcare settings.

DESIGN

Analysis of public health surveillance data.

METHODS

Central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data from intensive care units (ICUs) of facilities reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network in 2011 were analyzed. For CLABSI due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species, we computed 3 state-level summary measures of nonsusceptibility: crude percent nonsusceptible, model-based adjusted percent nonsusceptible, and crude infection incidence rate.

RESULTS

Overall, 1,791 facilities reported CLABSIs from ICU patients. Of 1,618 S. aureus CLABSIs with methicillin-susceptibility test results, 791 (48.9%) were due to MRSA. Of 756 Klebsiella CLABSIs with ESC-susceptibility test results, 209 (27.7%) were due to ESC-nonsusceptible Klebsiella, and among 661 Klebsiella CLABSI with carbapenem susceptibility test results, 70 (10.6%) were due to carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella. All 3 state-specific measures demonstrated variability in magnitude by state. Adjusted measures, with few exceptions, were not appreciably different from crude values for any phenotypes. When linking values of crude and adjusted percent nonsusceptible by state, a state’s absolute rank shifted slightly for MRSA in 5 instances and only once each for ESC-nonsusceptible and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Klebsiella species. Infection incidence measures correlated strongly with both percent nonsusceptibility measures.

CONCLUSIONS

Crude state-level summary measures, based on existing NHSN CLABSI data, may suffice to assess geographic variability in antibiotic resistance. As additional variables related to antibiotic resistance become available, risk-adjusted summary measures are preferable.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;36(1): 54–64

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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