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The Ethics of Empowering Patients as Partners in Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2016

Daniel Sharp*
Affiliation:
Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
Tara Palmore
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
Christine Grady
Affiliation:
Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland
*Corresponding
Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Building 10, 1C118, Bethesda, MD 20892 (cgrady@nih.gov)

Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2014

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References

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