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Enterococcal Infections: An Increasing Problem in Hospitalized Patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Margaret S. Terpenning
Affiliation:
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, and The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Marcus J. Zervos
Affiliation:
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, and The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Dennis R. Schaberg
Affiliation:
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, and The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Carol A. Kauffman*
Affiliation:
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Veterans Administration Medical Center, and The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
*
Veterans Administration Medical Center, 2215 Fuller Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

Abstract

We studied 157 episodes of infection or colonization with enterococci in 122 patients over a six-month period. One hundred twelve episodes (71.3%) occurred in patients over age 60 years. The most common sites for isolation of enterococci were the urinary tract, and bone and soft tissue. Nosocomial acquisition of enterococci occurred in 74.7% of all infections, and an additional 21% of episodes occurred in patients who had been transferred from another hospital or were regularly seen in the clinic. The overall mortality was 19.6%; 71.4% of those with bacteremia died. Enterococci appear to be significant pathogens, especially in older men in veterans' acute care hospitals and nursing home care units.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1988

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