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Costs of ambulatory pediatric healthcare-associated infections: Central-line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs), catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTIs), and surgical site infections (SSIs)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2020

Michael L. Rinke*
Affiliation:
Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Suzette O. Oyeku
Affiliation:
Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
William J. H. Ford
Affiliation:
Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York
Moonseong Heo
Affiliation:
Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina
Lisa Saiman
Affiliation:
Columbia University Irving Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
Patricia DeLaMora
Affiliation:
Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York
Barbara Rabin
Affiliation:
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
Philip Zachariah
Affiliation:
Columbia University Irving Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
Rebecca E. Rosenberg
Affiliation:
New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York
Parsa Mirhaji
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Oghale Obaro-Best
Affiliation:
State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
Michael Drasher
Affiliation:
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
Elizabeth Klein
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Alexandre Peshansky
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
David G. Bundy
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Michael L. Rinke, E-mail: mrinke@montefiore.org

Abstract

Objective:

Ambulatory healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur frequently in children and are associated with morbidity. Less is known about ambulatory HAI costs. This study estimated additional costs associated with pediatric ambulatory central-line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), and surgical site infections (SSIs) following ambulatory surgery.

Design:

Retrospective case-control study.

Setting:

Four academic medical centers.

Patients:

Children aged 0–22 years seen between 2010 and 2015 and at risk for HAI as identified by electronic queries.

Methods:

Chart review adjudicated HAIs. Charges were obtained for patients with HAIs and matched controls 30 days before HAI, on the day of, and 30 days after HAI. Charges were converted to costs and 2015 USD. Mixed-effects linear regression was used to estimate the difference-in-differences of HAI case versus control costs in 2 models: unrecorded charge values considered missing and a sensitivity analysis with unrecorded charge considered $0.

Results:

Our search identified 177 patients with ambulatory CLABSIs, 53 with ambulatory CAUTIs, and 26 with SSIs following ambulatory surgery who were matched with 382, 110, and 75 controls, respectively. Additional cost associated with an ambulatory CLABSI was $5,684 (95% confidence interval [CI], $1,005–$10,362) and $6,502 (95% CI, $2,261–$10,744) in the 2 models; cost associated with a CAUTI was $6,660 (95% CI, $1,055, $12,145) and $2,661 (95% CI, −$431 to $5,753); cost associated with an SSI following ambulatory surgery at 1 institution only was $6,370 (95% CI, $4,022–$8,719).

Conclusions:

Ambulatory HAI in pediatric patients are associated with significant additional costs. Further work is needed to reduce ambulatory HAIs.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: These data have been submitted to the Pediatric Academic Associations 2020 annual conference as an abstract.

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