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Burden of healthcare-associated infections among hospitalized children within community hospitals participating in an infection control network

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2021

Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo*
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Rebecca R. Young
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Michael J. Smith
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Sarah S. Lewis
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of MedicineDurham, North Carolina
Becky A. Smith
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of MedicineDurham, North Carolina
Deverick J. Anderson
Affiliation:
Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention, Durham, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of MedicineDurham, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo, E-mail: ica5@duke.edu

Abstract

We describe the frequency of pediatric healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) identified through prospective surveillance in community hospitals participating in an infection control network. Over a 6-year period, 84 HAIs were identified. Of these 51 (61%) were pediatric central-line–associated bloodstream infections, and they often occurred in children <1 year of age.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. This study was presented as poster 593 at IDWeek 2019 on October 3, 2019, in Washington, DC.

References

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