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Brief Report: Blood Contamination of Medical Records

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Gary P. Wormser
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Westchester County Medical Center, Valhalla, New York
Rosemary Medure-Collins
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Westchester County Medical Center, Valhalla, New York
Lynda Mack
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Westchester County Medical Center, Valhalla, New York

Extract

The epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has provided a major impetus to strengthen infection control practices in health care and laboratory settings. The widespread nature of blood contamination in the hospital environment, however, is often underappreciated. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and origin of blood contamination of medical records.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1989

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