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Association of a blood culture utilization intervention on antibiotic use in a pediatric intensive care unit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2019

Anna C. Sick-Samuels
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Charlotte Z. Woods-Hill
Affiliation:
Division of Critical Care, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
James C. Fackler
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Anesthesia and Critical Care, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Pranita D. Tamma
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Sybil A. Klaus
Affiliation:
MITRE Corporation, McLean, Virginia
Elizabeth E. Colantuoni
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Research Brief
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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References

Lamy, B, Dargere, S, Arendrup, MC, Parienti, JJ, Tattevin, P. How to optimize the use of blood cultures for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections? A state-of-the art. Front Microbiol 2016;7:697.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woods-Hill, CZ, Fackler, J, Nelson McMillan, K, et al. Association of a clinical practice guideline with blood culture use in critically ill children. JAMA Pediatr 2017;171:157164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Woods-Hill, CZ, Lee, L, Xie, A, et al. Dissemination of a novel framework to improve blood culture use in pediatric critical care. Pediatr Qual Saf 2018;3:e112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barlam, TF, Cosgrove, SE, Abbo, LM, et al. Implementing an antibiotic stewardship program: guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Clin Infect Dis 2016;62:e51e77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glass, G, Willson, V, Gottman, J. Design and Analysis of Time-Series Experiments. Boulder: Colorado Associated University Press; 1975.Google Scholar
Epstein, L, Edwards, JR, Halpin, AL, et al. Evaluation of a novel intervention to reduce unnecessary urine cultures in intensive care units at a tertiary care hospital in Maryland, 2011–2014. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:606609.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mullin, KM, Kovacs, CS, Fatica, C, et al. A multifaceted approach to reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the intensive care unit with an emphasis on “stewardship of culturing”. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:186188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hartley, SE, Kuhn, L, Valley, S, et al. Evaluating a hospitalist-based intervention to decrease unnecessary antimicrobial use in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:10441051.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stagg, A, Lutz, H, Kirpalaney, S, et al. Impact of two-step urine culture ordering in the emergency department: a time series analysis. BMJ Qual Saf 2018;27:140147.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Association of a blood culture utilization intervention on antibiotic use in a pediatric intensive care unit
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