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Antimicrobial never events: Objective application of a framework to assess vancomycin appropriateness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 December 2020

Jiajun Liu
Affiliation:
Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy Pharmacometrics Center of Excellence, Downers Grove, Illinois Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois
Nicholas J. Mercuro
Affiliation:
Department of pharmacy, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
Susan L. Davis
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
Tenzin Palmo
Affiliation:
Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois
Shivek Kashyap
Affiliation:
Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois
Twisha S. Patel
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lindsay A. Petty
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Paul R. Yarnold
Affiliation:
Optimal Data Analysis, Chicago, Illinois University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
Keith S. Kaye
Affiliation:
Michigan Medicine University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Marc H. Scheetz*
Affiliation:
Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy Pharmacometrics Center of Excellence, Downers Grove, Illinois Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois
*
Author for correspondence: Marc H. Scheetz, E-mail: mschee@midwestern.edu

Abstract

To address appropriateness of antibiotic use, we implemented an electronic framework to evaluate antibiotic “never events” (NEs) at 2 medical centers. Patient-level vancomycin administration records were classified as NEs or non-NEs. The objective framework allowed capture of true-positive vancomycin NEs in one-third of patients identified by the electronic strategy.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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References

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