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Antimicrobial activity of a continuous visible light disinfection system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2018

William A. Rutala*
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Hajime Kanamori
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Infection Control and Laboratory Diagnostics, Internal Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Maria F. Gergen
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Emily E. Sickbert-Bennett
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Daniel J. Sexton
Affiliation:
Duke Infection Control Outreach Network, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
Deverick J. Anderson
Affiliation:
Duke Infection Control Outreach Network, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
Jeffrey Laux
Affiliation:
North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute, North Carolina
David J. Weber
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program
Affiliation:
Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Infection Control and Laboratory Diagnostics, Internal Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan Duke Infection Control Outreach Network, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: William A. Rutala, PhD, UNC School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of Medicine, Bioinformatics Building, CB#7030, Chapel Hill, NC 27514-7030. E-mail: brutala@med.unc.edu

Abstract

We evaluated the ability of high-intensity visible violet light with a peak output of 405 nm to kill epidemiologically important pathogens. The high irradiant light significantly reduced both vegetative bacteria and spores at some time points over a 72-hour exposure period.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

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