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An Evaluation of Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Methods for Colon Surgery and Hysterectomy in Colorado Hospitals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 December 2014

Sara M. Reese*
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety and Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Bryan C. Knepper
Affiliation:
Department of Patient Safety and Quality, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado
Connie S. Price
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado.
Heather L. Young
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver Health Medical Center and University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado.
*
Address correspondence to Sara M. Reese, PhD, CIC, Denver Health Administration, 660 Bannock St., MC 0980, Denver, CO 80204 (sara.reese@dhha.org).

Abstract

Surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance techniques for colon surgery and hysterectomy among Colorado infection preventionists were characterized through an online survey. Considerable variation was found in SSI surveillance practices, specifically varying use of triggers for SSI review, including laboratory values, healthcare personnel communication, and postoperative visits.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–3

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2014 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 

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References

REFERENCES

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