Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-8rn5k Total loading time: 0.325 Render date: 2021-07-25T23:36:46.302Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Accuracy of Healthcare Worker Recall and Medical Record Review for Identifying Infectious Exposures to Hospitalized Patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

M. Aquino
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
J. M. Raboud
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
A. McGeer
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
K. Green
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
R. Chow
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
P. Dimoulas
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
M. Loeb
Affiliation:
Hamilton Health Sciences Center, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
D. Scales
Affiliation:
St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective.

To determine the validity of using healthcare worker (HCW) recall of patient interactions and medical record review for contact tracing in a critical care setting.

Design.

Trained observers recorded the interactions of nurses, respiratory therapists, and service assistants with study patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. These observers' records were used as the reference standard to test the criterion validity of using HCW recall data or medical record review data to identify exposure characteristics. We assessed the effects of previous quarantine of the HCW (because of possible exposure) and the availability of patients' medical records for use as memory aids on the accuracy of HCW recall.

Setting.

A 10-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario.

Patients.

Thirty-six HCWs observed caring for 16 patients, for a total of 55 healthcare worker shifts.

Results.

Recall accuracy was better among HCWs who were provided with patient medical records as memory aids (P<.01). However, HCWs tended to overestimate exposures when they used patient medical records as memory aids. For 6 of 26 procedures or care activities, this tendency to overestimate was statistically significant (P<.05). Most HCWs with true exposures were identified by means of this technique, despite the overestimations. Documentation of the activities of the 4 service assistants could not be found in any of the patients' medical records. Similarly, the interactions between 6 (19%) of 32 other patient–HCW pairs were not recorded in patients' medical records.

Conclusions.

Data collected from follow-up interviews with HCWs in which they are provided with patient medical records as memory aids should be adequate for contact tracing and for determining exposure histories. Neither follow-up interviews nor medical record review alone provide sufficient data for these purposes.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Varia, M, Wilson, S, Sarwal, S, et al; Hospital Outbreak Investigation Team. Investigation of a nosocomial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Toronto, Canada. CMAJ 2003; 169:285292.Google Scholar
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Severe acute respiratory syndrome—Taiwan, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2003; 52:461466.Google ScholarPubMed
3. Loeb, M, McGeer, A, Henry, B, et al. SARS among critical care nurses, Toronto. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10:251255.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Scales, DC, Green, K, Chan, AK, et al. Illness in intensive-care staff after brief exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome. Emerg Infect Dis 2003; 9:12051210.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. Lau, J, Fung, KS, Wong, TW, et al. SARS transmission among hospital workers in Hong Kong. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10:280286.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6. Park, B, Peck, A, Kuehnert, M, et al. Lack of SARS transmission among health care workers, United States. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10:244248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Teleman, MD, Baudville, IC, Heng, BH, Zhu, D, Leo, YS. Factors associated with transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers in Singapore. Epidemiol Infect 2004; 132:797803.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Kenyon, TA, Ridzon, R, Luskin-Hawk, R, et al. A nosocomial outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Ann Intern Med 1997; 127:3236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Zaza, S, Blumberg, HM, Beck-Sague, C, et al. Nosocomial transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: role of health care workers in outbreak propagation. J Infect Dis 1995; 172:15421549.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Ehrenberg, A, Ehnfors, M. The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Scand J Caring Sci 2001; 15:303310.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Aaronson, LS, Burman, ME. Use of health records in research: reliability and validity issues. Res Nurs Health 1994; 17:6773.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12. Karkkainen, O, Eriksson, K. Evaluation of patient records as part of developing a nursing care classification. J Clin Nurs 2003; 12:198205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13. Davis, B, Billings, J, Ryland, R. Evaluation of nursing process documentation. J Adv Nurs 1994; 19:960968.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
14. Ehnfors, M, Smedby, B. Nursing care as documented in patient records. Scand J Caring Sci 1993; 7:209220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15. Seto, WH, Tsang, D, Yung, RW, et al. Effectiveness of precautions against droplets and contact in prevention of nosocomial transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Lancet 2003; 361:15191520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Lau, J, Yang, X, Leung, PC, et al. SARS in three categories of hospital workers, Hong Kong. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10:13991404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
17. Maunder, R, Hunter, J, Vincent, L, et al. The immediate psychological and occupational impact of the 2003 SARS outbreak in a teaching hospital. CMAJ 2003; 168:12451251.Google Scholar
18. Hawryluck, L, Gold, WL, Robinson, S, Pogorski, S, Galea, S, Styra, R. SARS control and psychological effects of quarantine, Toronto, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10:12061212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Eveillard, M, Martin, Y, Hidri, N, Boussougant, Y, Joly-Guillou, ML. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among hospital employees: prevalence, duration, and transmission to households. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004; 25:114120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Moro, ML, Errante, I, Infuso, A, et al. Effectiveness of infection control measures in controlling a nosocomial outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV patients in Italy. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2000; 4:6168.Google Scholar
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Accuracy of Healthcare Worker Recall and Medical Record Review for Identifying Infectious Exposures to Hospitalized Patients
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Accuracy of Healthcare Worker Recall and Medical Record Review for Identifying Infectious Exposures to Hospitalized Patients
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Accuracy of Healthcare Worker Recall and Medical Record Review for Identifying Infectious Exposures to Hospitalized Patients
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *