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Power to the People: Where Has Personal Agency Gone in Leadership Development?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

D. Scott DeRue*
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
Susan J. Ashford
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
*Corresponding
E-mail: dsderue@umich.edu, Address: Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, 701 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2010

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