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Cultural Literacy, Historic Preservation, and Commemoration: Some Thoughts for Educational Historians

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2017

William W. Cutler III*
Affiliation:
Temple University

Abstract

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Type
Essay Review
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by the History of Education Society 

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References

1 For a thoughtful and humorous commentary on the art of public performance by professional historians, see Limerick, Patricia NelsonA How-to Guide for the Academic Going Public,Perspectives: American Historical Association Newsletter 37 (December 1999), 1, 17–21.

Google Scholar

2 Hosner, Charles B.The Broadening View of the Historical Preservation Movement,“ in Quimby, Ian M.G. ed., Material Culture and the Study of American Life (New York: W.W. Norton, 1978), 123.

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3 Rydell, Robert W. All the World's a Fair: Visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876–1916 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984). See also, idem, World of Fairs: The Century of Progress Expositions (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993).

4 Robinson, Charles Mulford Modern Civic Art or the City Made Beautiful (New York: Arno Press, 1970, reprint of the fourth edition, 1918, first published in 1903), 170.

5 Bogart, Michele Public Sculpture and the Civic Ideal in New York City, 1890–1930 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989); Schuyler, David The New Urban Landscape: The Redefinition of City Form in Nineteenth-Century America (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986); Rosenzweig, Roy & Blackmar, Elizabeth The Park and the People: A History of Central Park (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992); Bodnar, John Remaking America: Public Memory, Communication, and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992); Michael Kammen, Mystic Chords of Memory: The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture (New York: Alfred Knopf, 1991).

6 See, for example, Schlereth, Thomas J. Cultural History and Material Culture: Everyday Life, Landscapes, Museums (Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Research Press, 1990).

7 Hayden, Dolores The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995), esp. chapters 5–8.

8 Cremin, Lawrence A. American Education: The National Experience, 1783–1876 (New York: Harper and Row, 1980), ix.

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